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Get Your Rocket Fix From The Space Coast

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Even if you are nowhere near Florida, the Space Coast Launches site is a fun way to keep up with the latest rocket schedule from all the launch sites and operators. It’s got a “futuristic” design that ties together information about the launching companies, viewing locations, rocket data and upcoming schedules. Of course it’s promoting tourism to the launch sites, so you can even book hotels right from the site Bonus: you never have to hunt for where you can stream a launch. They have a live stream page that embed the feed of every live takeoff.

The Amazing Sound Of A 295ft Ice Hole

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As ridiculous a that title might sound, it’s a treat for the ears. Even though it’s been a year since scientist Peter Neff shared this great outtake from an Antarctic expedition, we give it a listen at least once a week. When that small ice chunk falls 90m (295ft) through the ice, the rattle is great but the old western shootout “ding” at the end is perfect. Check out more about the Ancient Ice project from the University of Rochester for some great behind the scenes shots on life on Antarctica.

Watch A NOAA Plane Fly Into The Eye Of Hurricane Lane

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In 2018, Hurricane Lane was the wettest storm in Hawaii’s recorded history – dropping over 52 inches of rain in some places. Being the first tropical cyclone to make landfall there in over two decades, it was a major event that, perhaps surprisingly, resulted in only one fatality and about $250 million in damage. As it approached the islands, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) flew one of its hurricane hunters into the eye of the storm giving us this eerily beautiful sight of the inside of the fierce storm. Check out the details on NOAA’s P-3 Orions and if you’re really into it, this is a great firsthand account of flying into Hurricane Hugo back in 1989.

Bronze Age Tools and Weapons Made From Meteorites

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Using “X-Ray Florescence Spectrometer” analysis of various Bronze Age artifacts, researchers have determined that the iron within them had to have come from space. On Earth, a lot of the nickel ore is buried very very deep as it sank closer to the core while the planet cooled, so extraterrestrial iron contains significantly more nickel than we might otherwise expect. And since humans would not develop smelting techniques hot enough to produce our own iron for another 2,000 years, finding a pre-smelted chuck of meteor would have been a great find for a smith of that age. They used those fortuitous finds to forge jewelry, tools and weapons including a dagger found in the tomb of King Tutenkhamen, shown above. you can read the full academic paper Bronze Age Iron: Meteoric Or Not? A Chemical Strategy in the Journal of Archeological Science though it requires a subscription, but check out Science Alert for a deeper dive.

OSNAP: The Ocean Sensor String From Canada To Scotland

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A subsurface array of sensors known as the Overturning in the Subpolar North Atlantic Program (OSNAP), extends from Canada’s Labrador Coast to the tip of Greenland, crosses south of Iceland and finally ends near the Outer Hebrides of Scotland. It measures the currents that move from the ocean depths to the warmer surface areas, a process that exchanges somewhere near 15.3 million cubic meters of water every second. As much as I want this sensor array to be a solid string of instruments, it’s actually 53 different moorings of independent sensor clusters measuring temperature, salinity and water speed. You can see in the diagram below that the sensors are arranged in 3 distinct clusters – one across the Labrador Sea, another spanning the Irminger Sea and a final cluster from the Iceland Basin to Scotland’s Rockall Trough. Featured Image: Recovering the flotation sphere for mooring CF4 with an iceberg in the background. Pictured from left to right: Andrew Davies, Pete Liarikos, John Kemp and Brian Hogue. Photo by Isabela Alexander-Astiz Le Bras

Our Favorite 2018 Achievements In Exploration

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When we speak of exploration in the modern era, many people are surprised to learn how much is left unknown on our own planet, much less in the cosmos beyond. While we see hyper-realistic renderings of deep space entities and 3D maps of the ocean floor with some regularity, our sense of omniscience is a tenuous one. The reality is that we’re constantly discovering new things, both near and far away. In 2018, scientists and explorers made huge strides to expand our understanding of the world and create the technology and science that will drive discoveries for years to come. As we hurdle into the new year, we’ve assembled our favorite exploration milestones from 2018, from light years away to the deepest parts of the sea. SpaceX Double Booster Landing The last time so many people watched an aerospace event together was the Felix Baumgartner jump in 2012. Then, in February 2018, we all collectively held our breath and were treated to one of the most unexpectedly beautiful sights of the year as twin boosters from the SpaceX Falcon Heavy touched down simultaneously. With 21 launches (18 of them commercial) last year, SpaceX confirmed its position as the leader in...Read...

Watch The Hypnotizing Rotation of Mars

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The past decade has given us amazing footage of Mars from orbit and from the ground but it wasn’t until I saw this video of assembled imagery that I realized I’d never seen a full rotation of its surface anywhere. Assembled by a Redditor from orbital imagery using Blender.

The World Below: Incredible 4K Time Lapse From The ISS

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Bruce Berry compiled assorted ISS 4K video feeds to create a beautiful and immersive trip around the world as only a few get to see it. As the era of ultra high-definition orbital footage continues to produce incredible gems like this, hopefully we’ll all get a bit more of the “overview effect“.

Our 2018 Client Gifts: Science and Exploration Books

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Annual client gifts are a fun tradition that give us an excuse to get the things we’ve been eyeing all year. We try to avoid the frivolous, the disposable and the self-serving; instead our gifts are things that we’d like to receive ourselves which have lasting value and represent the spirit of Lat Long, without being plastered in our branding.  Our theory is that something meaningful and useful will be reminder enough of our focus on tangible success and craftsmanship.  This year has been a banner year for adventure and travel writing – dozens of “coffee table” books were published that have left us yearning for more coffee table space. So we decided that helping our clients build their own exploration libraries would be the focus of our 2018 gift list. The Books We’re Gifting The Great Wide Open: New Outdoor and Landscape Photography Off The Road: Explorers, Vans and Life Off the Beaten Track Into the Unknown: Tales from the Great Explorers Map: Exploring the World Pantone Foodmood(Okay, so it has nothing to do with science/exploration but this book is too cool not to gift) Around the World: An Atlas for Today The Outsiders: The New Outdoor Creativity The...Read...

The 8 Cases of Whiskey Hidden Around The World

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In the late 1960s, Canadian Club hid 25 cases of their whiskey in remote locations around the world and launched a marketing campaign to encourage adventurous fans to seek them out.  Over 50 years later, at least 8 remain undiscovered (or at least, unreported). The cases were hidden in destinations like Mt. Kilimanjaro, Angel Falls, Death Valley, Tonga and more. Some of the undiscovered cases are believed to be in Lake Placid, Loch Ness, Yukon Territory and Robinson Caruso Island waiting for some enterprising (and very lucky) person to stumble upon them. Perhaps best of all, they produced these incredible ads: